Tag Archives: snow storm

Keeping You Safe While Driving Through Severe Weather Conditions

Car in Snow

Today’s forecast consists of heavy rain and snow. In an effort to help prepare and keep you safe for the commute home, allow us to share some helpful reminders and additional information about driving in severe weather conditions from Travelers Insurance.

Driving for Winter Conditions

Before you leave the driveway or parking lot, take time to clear snow and ice off your car, including your windows, mirrors, lights, reflectors, hood, roof and trunk. Drive with your headlights on, and be sure to keep them clean to improve visibility. Use caution when snow banks limit your view of oncoming traffic.

As you get on the road, remember that speed limits are meant for dry roads, not roads covered in snow and ice. You should reduce your speed and increase your following distance as road conditions and visibility worsen. Turn your headlights on to help other vehicles see you. Avoid using cruise control in snowy or icy conditions – you want as much control of your car as possible. Be cautious on bridges and overpasses as they are commonly the first areas to become icy, and avoid passing snow plows and sand trucks. The drivers can have limited visibility, and the road in front of them could be worse than the road behind.

What Is Black Ice?

Black ice is not actually black in color — it’s clear enough that you can see the road beneath it, making it appear “black.” Black ice may also be difficult to distinguish from a wet roadway and may appear wet and shiny. An absence of air bubbles allows it to blend in with any surface, making it difficult to see for pedestrians on sidewalks as well as for drivers on winter roads. Fog, light freezing rain, and melting and refreezing precipitation can all cause black ice to form.

Even if the air temperature is above freezing, cooler surface temperatures may mean black ice could still present a hazard on the roads. Vehicle exhaust moisture can also cause black ice to form on roadways, where drivers may not expect it, such as intersections where stopped vehicles may idle for brief periods of time allowing condensate to form.

We wish you a safe commute home! Please feel free to contact us if you have additional questions or would like us to review your auto policy.

Preventing Ice Dams and Winter Roof Damage

Ice Dam

We hope that everyone has remained safe through this snow storm. Now that the snow has fallen, it’s time to think about the ice dams that are likely to form and follow. In an effort to help keep you informed of some of the best practices, allow us to share some helpful tips surrounding ice dam prevention and/or removal.

An ice dam forms when melting snow freezes at the edge of your roof line. If you do not remove the snow, you run the risk of the ice dam growing large enough to keep the water from draining off the roof.  The water could then back up underneath the shingles and find its way to the interior. This can damage your roof, attic, and upper levels of your building.

How do you tell if you have an Ice Dam?

  • Look for large icicles hanging from the gutters and sides of the roof, as this is a sign that water may be trapped on your roof
  • Look for water stains in your attic ceiling or exterior walls

Steps you can take to prevent an Ice Dam:

  • Remove snow from your roof after every heavy storm before it freezes by using a roof rake.
  • Make sure that leaders and gutters are clear of leaves and debris so melted snow can drain properly
  • Insulate your roof and attic.
  • Seal up any holes in the roof that can cause water to seep through
  • Make sure any vent pipes, exhaust fans, chimneys, attic fans, and light fixtures are properly insulated and sealed.
  • Install a leak barrier underneath the shingles to act as an additional preventative measure, as it keeps water from seeping inside your building.

Tips for removing an Ice Dam:

  • Call a roof professional. If this is done incorrectly, you may cause further damage to your roof.
  • Do not use rock salt to melt the ice, as this could lead to even more damage.
  • If you do choose to remove it yourself, you can use calcium chloride to melt the ice.

As the cold winter months continue, please be proactive and prepare for the possibility of an ice dam forming on your roof. Doing all you can to prevent an ice dam will alleviate your stress and bring you closer to a worry-free season. We hope you all remain safe.