Are You Done With Paying Comprehensive and Collision Insurance?

auto service callIn this economic climate we are all looking for ways to skim back, trim the fat, however dropping your collision/comprehensive coverage may be a costly decision.

We use our cars for the dreaded carpool, family vacations, to drive mommy dearest to her Doctor’s appointments, as well as to move your son back home for the second time. Lastly, you have just paid his tuition fees for the Fall Semester and this seems to be good time to scale back on expenses. You know you’re a safe driver! And you no longer are required to carry comprehensive and collision coverage, so why not drop it?

In the meantime your vehicle is damaged beyond repair. The other driver is at fault but doesn’t have adequate insurance or any insurance at all to replace your vehicle or the other two parked cars he/she has hit. You will now incur the costs of purchasing a new car.

For example: If at the time of loss, coverage was still in place, your 2010 vehicle valued at $11,000 was subject to a $1,000 deductible; and you and the carrier agree on a settlement of $9,000. A check for $8,000 would surely come in handy.

The average cost for a moderately priced sedan is between $25,000-$30,000. Finance agreements typically last for 4 years. A general rule of thumb would be to drop the coverage for average vehicles after 10 years. Antique or Classic automobiles would be an exception as their value often appreciates.

You can reference http://www.nadaguides.com for estimates of all types of vehicles. This type of information will help you make an informed decision as to whether or not you should keep Comprehensive and Collision coverage in place.

– Lavette Wright

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